The Bygone Collection is a superb range of sliding sash windows in a league of its own. By listening to our clients, incorporating their ideas and paying close attention to detail, we have ensured that our products are virtually indistinguishable from the originals. They’ll maintain the character and charm of your property with traditional weights and pulleys or modern spring-balanced options.

Astragal glazing bars

Double glazing companies that don’t appreciate balanced aesthetics often provide the cheapest method of mimicking glazing patterns, regardless of how real they look.

This is normally evident with them putting Georgian "canes" inside the cavity of the two sheets of glass. They rarely look real and highlight “cheap windows” immediately.

Cheap to produce, but flat, dull and extremely poor imitations of the real thing, they remain brilliant white and out of character against the weathered feel of the rest of the window.

With Bygone sash windows you get authentic, three-dimensional surface mounted astragal bars that are bonded, clipped and interlocked to ensure they never become detached.

Externally these are again “putty lined” to match the chamfered sash, and have an Ovolo internally to match the glazing beads Harmony has standard depth bars, while Melody and Symphony have the prettier, more authentic glazing bars.

While most will want to match existing patterns of glazing bars, any design, layout or pattern can be provided, just inform your Premier Partner.

 

Balanced aesthetics

Sash windows usually comprise two sliding sashes each retaining a double-glazed, sealed unit. In most cases, the window will be "split" equally in the height so the visible glass will be the same height in each unit.

Aesthetically however, it’s important to have clean vertical lines that run through the upper and lower sashes. You’ll want the bars to align and the Georgian squares to be of equal size.

Imitation or cheap windows try to mimic this detail but fail. Look closely at neighbouring houses and you’ll soon see the mishmash of glazing panes. Irrespective of which collection you chose, all Bygone sash windows can be designed to ensure sightlines align and panes within the same window are equal if specified.

 

Balance retaining clip
Balance retaining clips

Goods in transit are liable to move about a little, it’s entirely natural and impossible to prevent, be it movement in the factory, on a delivery vehicle or the fitters installing the window.

Not surprisingly then, sometimes balance springs can slip off the "shoe", designed to hold the balance and sash together. Detached balances generally mean a service call is required which we seek to avoid. So with every Bygone sash window balances are held firmly in place with a retaining clip, that once snapped into position locks the balance in place for life.

You will never need to see a service engineer and we won’t have a service call to make.

 

Bar Handles

The new Antique Brass Bar Handle available on the Bygone range adds yet another truly authentic choice to our collection.  Besides being beautiful and traditional, the bar handles would be a useful alternative to scroll handles for low threshold windows and would make opening the windows even easier.

Beautiful, bespoke Bygone cam catches

The weakest part on any original sash window was the cam catch. Burglars would flick the latch with a butter knife to gain entry.

It’s not so with Bygone sash windows as every range has a beautiful selection of cam catches in either a traditional Beehive or Acorn shape with matching tilt release knobs. Look closely and you’ll see each keep has a nylon insert to protect the claw from being scoured. Four screws and two secret location pins hold every keep firmly in place even through rigorous testing. 

Available in Antique brass, polished chrome, pewter, satin chrome, black or white with matching limit stops and sash lift handles these are robust and solid, screwed into steel reinforcement for maximum strength. Being handed left and right, centralises the sashes in the frame, making it SBD compliant and strong enough to act as a deterrent to any unwanted visitors.

 

Beautiful wood grained sash windows

No shiny white plastic here. As standard, each of our unique collections, Bygone Melody, Harmony, and Symphony are made with beautiful, textured, wood grained acrylic foil, and with any RAL or Farrow and Ball colour they will look superb, especially antique cream, green or classic black frames with white sashes.

 

Chamfered Putty line sashes
Chamfered putty line sashes

We know you’ll care about authentic details as much as we do. Externally old wooden sash windows had putty glazing, which sloped back to the glass at an angle of 45 degrees. This lovely putty line is included on every Bygone collection window for this very reason. Internally our beads are Ovolo shaped, again just like on original windows.

Our sash profiles are all multi-chambered. This means there are three individual pockets inside the sections so that the galvanised steel reinforcement is inserted into its own sealed chamber, well away from the separate drainage channel that allows rainwater to run away easily.

Whilst Bygone Melody sash windows have the standard beads and glazing bars, both Harmony and Symphony have the larger, more traditionally detailed versions and slimmer, more energy efficient sealed units.

 

Cill Pads
Cill pads

Water has a knack of finding any weakness. Sash window joints are no exception, that’s why we invented adhesive foam pads that seal the joints between the cill and the frame. Every window on each range has these bespoke pads as standard so that you’ll never need to worry as they prevent any chance of water ingress

In addition, the brush piles are cut back to prevent them acting as wicks and drawing water into your home... and then, as a final preventative measure for your complete peace of mind, we add a short silicone seal as well.

Don’t take chances with your home. By spending a little extra during the manufacturing process, you’ll be protected from the inconvenience and disappointment of damp walls or wet carpets.

 

Deep Bottom Rail
Deep bottom rail

These days alas, little attention is given to a window’s sightlines or how it is framed in an opening.

Traditionally, the lower rail of the bottom sash was often made from 4" or 5" timbers, plained to about 100mm. This was substantially heavier (deeper) than the side members or mid-rail because it had to carry more weight than the upper sash.

While it is far quicker, cheaper and easier to weld profiles of equal size, it would not look traditional. All Bygone collection windows have this thicker, butt jointed deep bottom rail as standard.

 

Dummy Sash
Dummy sash

Not all windows need to open providing you have sufficient opening area for the floor area; normally 1/20th is recommended.

In order to retain equal sight lines or occasionally to offer you a saving, it is possible to make dummy sashes. These are real sashes made in the same fashion as sliding ones. Only the window furniture, hardware and balances are removed.

 

External Sash Horns
External sash horns

Originally sash horns were built into the window to act as “stops” to prevent sashes being over-extended, smashing the pulley wheels or damaging the lead weights inside the box framework.

Today sash horns are purely decorative as there are other “stops”, however they are needed to retain the traditional appearance of your box sash windows.

Unlike decorative, “clip on” horns which can become detached, look artificial and have a tendency to fade, all Bygone sash horns are sculptured from the sash itself, as “run through” or “continuous horns”, with fitted end caps to close the chambers.

Currently there is one shape of horn, but two different styles are currently being reviewed. External sash horns come as standard on all ranges.

 

Foam Pads
Foam baffles

Extrusion companies who design the profiles recommend that sashes are fully reinforced with steel to provide strength to deter burglars.

This is to prevent deflection in windy weather and to strengthen the sashes so they are capable of carrying the weight of the glass, and providing a strong secure fixing for the handles, latches, and other components.

Not every company complies with these rules. Some will reduce costs by removing this reinforcement altogether so you just have plastic with no reinforcement. Others use plastic sections to reinforce plastic sections, again to cut corners and charge you over the odds.

Every Bygone sash window (apart from curved head windows) has a length of galvanized steel reinforcement that is a full 1.5mm thick, not the 1-1.2mm that is sometimes offered by others. So be assured that your Bygone windows will be far stronger, more secure and substantially heavier than others... they are simply built to last.

 

Georgi Clip
Georgi® clips

Most people push, pull, or lift their sash windows using the Georgian bars not the handles, just watch yourself next time…

Whilst Astragal bars add character and charm to the window and recreate the original look, using them as handles excerpts can put considerable pressure on them, causing them to come off in your hand and the window remaining shut.

Typically, bars are stuck onto the glass as a series of individual bars. This increases the opportunity for shoddy joints and for the number of bars that could fail, besides which, every company specifically excludes plant on Georgian bars from their guarantees.

Our windows are unique. Clever, patented interlocking joints where the bars meet, together with Georgi®-clips (patented to our company), mean that each bar is continuous and cut the full size of the sash. Each bar is secretly notched so they are inter-locked, clamped and then bonded against the glass surface. We are so confident with this technology that you can open and close any of our sashes using the bars; they won’t come off.

 

Lift Out Pivot Bars
Lift-out pivot bars

Windows are not just for letting in light and keeping the elements at bay – sometimes they need to be used to move in large objects like furniture. All Bygone sash windows have split pivot bar technology so you can remove the sash without the need to tamper with the balance mechanism. This two-part pivot bar system allows sashes to be removed and reinstated quickly and safely.

 

Pole eyes and Scroll Handles
Pole eye and scroll handles

It is customary to have a “ring pull” or “pole eye” fitted to the centre of the top rail on the upper sash (a swan neck hook and pole can be supplied if required).

Alternatively, a “D-Handle” can be fitted to the underside of the top sash if requested.

Scroll handles are fitted to the bottom of the bottom sash by the installation team once the windows are fitted. Some clients prefer to leave them off, others have specific ideas for where they wish to see them fitted. Ordinarily they should align with Georgian bars or be equidistant between them.

 

Safety stays

All Bygone sash windows can be tilted inwards to make cleaning easier and safer. Particularly large sashes cannot be allowed to tilt for cleaning, as the sash is simply too heavy, exceeding the maximum permissible weight to be tilted safely.

Lighter sashes can be heavy but those exceeding the maximum sizes could be dangerous. That’s why uniquely, on every Bygone window that exceeds the safe size for the standard easy clean, tilt restrictors, we fit a short pair of safety stays. So if a large window should be accidentally opened, it will remain vertical, unable to damage anyone or anything.

We are the only manufacturer to fit safety stays to oversized sashes. Although they do not allow for cleaning, they WILL prevent accidents.

 

Travel or Limit Stop
Travel or limit stops

These are devices that prevent a window from opening beyond 100mm, particularly useful for bedrooms.

There have been several variations of travel restrictors, from a simple nail or screw bolts going through both sashes to chunky wrap around locks or plastic spring loaded catches.

These are often bulky, fiddly for the elderly or visually impaired people and sit proud of the face of the sash. Bygone collection travel stops have been specially commissioned to our bespoke design to sit flush in the surface and screwed to steel reinforcement. This reduces wear on brush piles and prevents draughts for years to come.

In case you’re wondering why there are two limit stops on your windows it is because experience has shown that fitting just one to one side only will, over time, cause the lower sash to twist.

The constant banging of the lower sash against the limit stop forces the lower sash into a trapezoidal shape, loosening the glass setting blocks, which leads to the glass becoming loose in the sash.

By fitting a pair of limit stops, any force from banging the sashes is equalised, actually keeping the sashes square for the life of the window and aesthetically balancing the appearance of the window.

 

Tilt Facility
Tilt facility

Building regulations require windows made today to be capable of being cleaned easily from inside the building. Therefore Bygone sash windows have a tilt mechanism to facilitate easy cleaning.

Short spring-loaded "bolts" engage the sash behind the frame section, while standard ones are mainly plastic and not too strong. They are often fiddly or cumbersome to operate.

Not with Bygone sash windows, as every window has the “sashsecure” steel reinforced and wrap around finger latches designed to centralize sashes within the frame, and increase the strength and security of our windows. They come with a choice of Beehive or Acorn designs for the cam claw and tilt release knobs and three beautiful colours: antique brass, pewter or polished chrome.

 

Tilt Facility
Tilt restrictors

Tilt restrictors are metal side arms, made from stainless steel, that allow sliding sashes to be tilted for cleaning safely. With sashes often weighing over 40lbs in weight, it’s vital that a pair of stays is fitted to each sash, both top and bottom.

Some companies will save costs by fitting tilt restrictors to the lower sash only, or by fitting just a single tilt restrictor to each sash.

This is a false economy, as a pair of tilt restrictors on each sash provides double the safety. Without them there is a risk that sashes could crash into the room.

Some makes of tilt restrictors are extremely sharp, acting as scissors cutting through the brush pile and reducing the effectiveness of the brush seal every time they are opened or closed, allowing in air to create draughts.

On our windows, these edges are especially rounded to ensure the tilt restrictor rolls past the brush pile, leaving the pile to do its job – preventing drafts.

 

Torso Balance
Torso spiral spring balances

These make your sash windows work – just as the weights did in the original windows.

Originally, on timber windows, the weight of the glass and sash was counterbalanced by a lead weight dangling on the end of the cord.

These counter weights meant that wooden windows would open easily (when not painted shut) and remain in the position required, because the glass and timber sash weight was equal to the lead weights, thus it is counter-balanced.

Little or no effort was required to move the sash because there is no friction between the sash and the frame, that’s why they often rattled and were draughty.

These are the Rolls Royce of spring balances. Designed by a Dutchman in 1946, they epitomise great engineering. Individually manufactured in 0.5kg increments (1lb), and for perfect lengths, these balances have two springs; one wound clockwise, the other anti-clockwise.

As a sash is opened, so one spring extends getting longer as the other compresses, getting shorter, counterbalancing each other for their entire life. They are immensely reliable.

 

Trickle Vents
Trickle vents

It is vital to have good ventilation. Without it people can suffer from breathing difficulties from poor air quality. Original box sashes provided 'natural background ventilation'… known as draughts.

The current building regulations for new buildings offer four system possibilities of achieving background ventilation. The most common adopted methods incorporate the use of trickle vents. Your architect will specify which method has been designed into your property.

When replacing existing windows the rules are slightly more relaxed. If trickle vents are present in the existing windows, they need to be incorporated into the new windows, however we would prefer not to fit them because they provide a super passage for airborn dirt, wind and noise to pass straight through our windows.

We would prefer you used sash windows properly, with both the top and bottom open. Sash windows are more efficient at purge ventilation and changing air than ANY other style of window.

For more information see health benefits.

 

Warning Label
Warning labels

There is nothing much to worry about with our windows – its just the sashes we make can be very heavy and we’d like to remind you before you try tilting them inwards for cleaning. They have been tested not to fail but its far better to be safe than sorry…

 

Colour suited window furniture
Window furniture suited colours

If you are considering cheaper alternatives where companies simply decide handles, cams, keeps and knobs by price alone, you’ll end up with three or four different colours of brass on the same window.

Because we use just one supplier for all our furniture they guarantee that all the window furniture on Bygone sash windows will match, every component will suite together so cam catches, knobs, limit stops, pole eyes and sash lifts (scroll handles) are available in antique brass, pewter, polished chrome, satin chrome, black and white.

 

Astragal glazing bars

Double glazing companies that don’t appreciate balanced aesthetics often provide the cheapest method of mimicking glazing patterns, regardless of how real they look.

This is normally evident with them putting Georgian "canes" inside the cavity of the two sheets of glass. They rarely look real and highlight “cheap windows” immediately.

Cheap to produce, but flat, dull and extremely poor imitations of the real thing, they remain brilliant white and out of character against the weathered feel of the rest of the window.

With Bygone sash windows you get authentic, three-dimensional surface mounted astragal bars that are bonded, clipped and interlocked to ensure they never become detached.

Externally these are again “putty lined” to match the chamfered sash, and have an Ovolo internally to match the glazing beads Harmony has standard depth bars, while Melody and Symphony have the prettier, more authentic glazing bars.

While most will want to match existing patterns of glazing bars, any design, layout or pattern can be provided, just inform your Premier Partner.

 

Balanced aesthetics

Sash windows usually comprise two sliding sashes each retaining a double-glazed, sealed unit. In most cases, the window will be "split" equally in the height so the visible glass will be the same height in each unit.

Aesthetically however, it’s important to have clean vertical lines that run through the upper and lower sashes. You’ll want the bars to align and the Georgian squares to be of equal size.

Imitation or cheap windows try to mimic this detail but fail. Look closely at neighbouring houses and you’ll soon see the mishmash of glazing panes. Irrespective of which collection you chose, all Bygone sash windows can be designed to ensure sightlines align and panes within the same window are equal if specified.

 

Balance retaining clip
Balance retaining clips

Goods in transit are liable to move about a little, it’s entirely natural and impossible to prevent, be it movement in the factory, on a delivery vehicle or the fitters installing the window.

Not surprisingly then, sometimes balance springs can slip off the "shoe", designed to hold the balance and sash together. Detached balances generally mean a service call is required which we seek to avoid. So with every Bygone sash window balances are held firmly in place with a retaining clip, that once snapped into position locks the balance in place for life.

You will never need to see a service engineer and we won’t have a service call to make.

 

Bar Handles

The new Antique Brass Bar Handle available on the Bygone range adds yet another truly authentic choice to our collection.  Besides being beautiful and traditional, the bar handles would be a useful alternative to scroll handles for low threshold windows and would make opening the windows even easier.

Beautiful, bespoke Bygone cam catches

The weakest part on any original sash window was the cam catch. Burglars would flick the latch with a butter knife to gain entry.

It’s not so with Bygone sash windows as every range has a beautiful selection of cam catches in either a traditional Beehive or Acorn shape with matching tilt release knobs. Look closely and you’ll see each keep has a nylon insert to protect the claw from being scoured. Four screws and two secret location pins hold every keep firmly in place even through rigorous testing. 

Available in Antique brass, polished chrome, pewter, satin chrome, black or white with matching limit stops and sash lift handles these are robust and solid, screwed into steel reinforcement for maximum strength. Being handed left and right, centralises the sashes in the frame, making it SBD compliant and strong enough to act as a deterrent to any unwanted visitors.

 

Beautiful wood grained sash windows

No shiny white plastic here. As standard, each of our unique collections, Bygone Melody, Harmony, and Symphony are made with beautiful, textured, wood grained acrylic foil, and with any RAL or Farrow and Ball colour they will look superb, especially antique cream, green or classic black frames with white sashes.

 

Chamfered Putty line sashes
Chamfered putty line sashes

We know you’ll care about authentic details as much as we do. Externally old wooden sash windows had putty glazing, which sloped back to the glass at an angle of 45 degrees. This lovely putty line is included on every Bygone collection window for this very reason. Internally our beads are Ovolo shaped, again just like on original windows.

Our sash profiles are all multi-chambered. This means there are three individual pockets inside the sections so that the galvanised steel reinforcement is inserted into its own sealed chamber, well away from the separate drainage channel that allows rainwater to run away easily.

Whilst Bygone Melody sash windows have the standard beads and glazing bars, both Harmony and Symphony have the larger, more traditionally detailed versions and slimmer, more energy efficient sealed units.

 

Cill Pads
Cill pads

Water has a knack of finding any weakness. Sash window joints are no exception, that’s why we invented adhesive foam pads that seal the joints between the cill and the frame. Every window on each range has these bespoke pads as standard so that you’ll never need to worry as they prevent any chance of water ingress

In addition, the brush piles are cut back to prevent them acting as wicks and drawing water into your home... and then, as a final preventative measure for your complete peace of mind, we add a short silicone seal as well.

Don’t take chances with your home. By spending a little extra during the manufacturing process, you’ll be protected from the inconvenience and disappointment of damp walls or wet carpets.

 

Deep Bottom Rail
Deep bottom rail

These days alas, little attention is given to a window’s sightlines or how it is framed in an opening.

Traditionally, the lower rail of the bottom sash was often made from 4" or 5" timbers, plained to about 100mm. This was substantially heavier (deeper) than the side members or mid-rail because it had to carry more weight than the upper sash.

While it is far quicker, cheaper and easier to weld profiles of equal size, it would not look traditional. All Bygone collection windows have this thicker, butt jointed deep bottom rail as standard.

 

Dummy Sash
Dummy sash

Not all windows need to open providing you have sufficient opening area for the floor area; normally 1/20th is recommended.

In order to retain equal sight lines or occasionally to offer you a saving, it is possible to make dummy sashes. These are real sashes made in the same fashion as sliding ones. Only the window furniture, hardware and balances are removed.

 

External Sash Horns
External sash horns

Originally sash horns were built into the window to act as “stops” to prevent sashes being over-extended, smashing the pulley wheels or damaging the lead weights inside the box framework.

Today sash horns are purely decorative as there are other “stops”, however they are needed to retain the traditional appearance of your box sash windows.

Unlike decorative, “clip on” horns which can become detached, look artificial and have a tendency to fade, all Bygone sash horns are sculptured from the sash itself, as “run through” or “continuous horns”, with fitted end caps to close the chambers.

Currently there is one shape of horn, but two different styles are currently being reviewed. External sash horns come as standard on all ranges.

 

Foam Pads
Foam baffles

Extrusion companies who design the profiles recommend that sashes are fully reinforced with steel to provide strength to deter burglars.

This is to prevent deflection in windy weather and to strengthen the sashes so they are capable of carrying the weight of the glass, and providing a strong secure fixing for the handles, latches, and other components.

Not every company complies with these rules. Some will reduce costs by removing this reinforcement altogether so you just have plastic with no reinforcement. Others use plastic sections to reinforce plastic sections, again to cut corners and charge you over the odds.

Every Bygone sash window (apart from curved head windows) has a length of galvanized steel reinforcement that is a full 1.5mm thick, not the 1-1.2mm that is sometimes offered by others. So be assured that your Bygone windows will be far stronger, more secure and substantially heavier than others... they are simply built to last.

 

Georgi Clip
Georgi® clips

Most people push, pull, or lift their sash windows using the Georgian bars not the handles, just watch yourself next time…

Whilst Astragal bars add character and charm to the window and recreate the original look, using them as handles excerpts can put considerable pressure on them, causing them to come off in your hand and the window remaining shut.

Typically, bars are stuck onto the glass as a series of individual bars. This increases the opportunity for shoddy joints and for the number of bars that could fail, besides which, every company specifically excludes plant on Georgian bars from their guarantees.

Our windows are unique. Clever, patented interlocking joints where the bars meet, together with Georgi®-clips (patented to our company), mean that each bar is continuous and cut the full size of the sash. Each bar is secretly notched so they are inter-locked, clamped and then bonded against the glass surface. We are so confident with this technology that you can open and close any of our sashes using the bars; they won’t come off.

 

Lift Out Pivot Bars
Lift-out pivot bars

Windows are not just for letting in light and keeping the elements at bay – sometimes they need to be used to move in large objects like furniture. All Bygone sash windows have split pivot bar technology so you can remove the sash without the need to tamper with the balance mechanism. This two-part pivot bar system allows sashes to be removed and reinstated quickly and safely.

 

Pole eyes and Scroll Handles
Pole eye and scroll handles

It is customary to have a “ring pull” or “pole eye” fitted to the centre of the top rail on the upper sash (a swan neck hook and pole can be supplied if required).

Alternatively, a “D-Handle” can be fitted to the underside of the top sash if requested.

Scroll handles are fitted to the bottom of the bottom sash by the installation team once the windows are fitted. Some clients prefer to leave them off, others have specific ideas for where they wish to see them fitted. Ordinarily they should align with Georgian bars or be equidistant between them.

 

Safety stays

All Bygone sash windows can be tilted inwards to make cleaning easier and safer. Particularly large sashes cannot be allowed to tilt for cleaning, as the sash is simply too heavy, exceeding the maximum permissible weight to be tilted safely.

Lighter sashes can be heavy but those exceeding the maximum sizes could be dangerous. That’s why uniquely, on every Bygone window that exceeds the safe size for the standard easy clean, tilt restrictors, we fit a short pair of safety stays. So if a large window should be accidentally opened, it will remain vertical, unable to damage anyone or anything.

We are the only manufacturer to fit safety stays to oversized sashes. Although they do not allow for cleaning, they WILL prevent accidents.

 

Travel or Limit Stop
Travel or limit stops

These are devices that prevent a window from opening beyond 100mm, particularly useful for bedrooms.

There have been several variations of travel restrictors, from a simple nail or screw bolts going through both sashes to chunky wrap around locks or plastic spring loaded catches.

These are often bulky, fiddly for the elderly or visually impaired people and sit proud of the face of the sash. Bygone collection travel stops have been specially commissioned to our bespoke design to sit flush in the surface and screwed to steel reinforcement. This reduces wear on brush piles and prevents draughts for years to come.

In case you’re wondering why there are two limit stops on your windows it is because experience has shown that fitting just one to one side only will, over time, cause the lower sash to twist.

The constant banging of the lower sash against the limit stop forces the lower sash into a trapezoidal shape, loosening the glass setting blocks, which leads to the glass becoming loose in the sash.

By fitting a pair of limit stops, any force from banging the sashes is equalised, actually keeping the sashes square for the life of the window and aesthetically balancing the appearance of the window.

 

Tilt Facility
Tilt facility

Building regulations require windows made today to be capable of being cleaned easily from inside the building. Therefore Bygone sash windows have a tilt mechanism to facilitate easy cleaning.

Short spring-loaded "bolts" engage the sash behind the frame section, while standard ones are mainly plastic and not too strong. They are often fiddly or cumbersome to operate.

Not with Bygone sash windows, as every window has the “sashsecure” steel reinforced and wrap around finger latches designed to centralize sashes within the frame, and increase the strength and security of our windows. They come with a choice of Beehive or Acorn designs for the cam claw and tilt release knobs and three beautiful colours: antique brass, pewter or polished chrome.

 

Tilt Facility
Tilt restrictors

Tilt restrictors are metal side arms, made from stainless steel, that allow sliding sashes to be tilted for cleaning safely. With sashes often weighing over 40lbs in weight, it’s vital that a pair of stays is fitted to each sash, both top and bottom.

Some companies will save costs by fitting tilt restrictors to the lower sash only, or by fitting just a single tilt restrictor to each sash.

This is a false economy, as a pair of tilt restrictors on each sash provides double the safety. Without them there is a risk that sashes could crash into the room.

Some makes of tilt restrictors are extremely sharp, acting as scissors cutting through the brush pile and reducing the effectiveness of the brush seal every time they are opened or closed, allowing in air to create draughts.

On our windows, these edges are especially rounded to ensure the tilt restrictor rolls past the brush pile, leaving the pile to do its job – preventing drafts.

 

Torso Balance
Torso spiral spring balances

These make your sash windows work – just as the weights did in the original windows.

Originally, on timber windows, the weight of the glass and sash was counterbalanced by a lead weight dangling on the end of the cord.

These counter weights meant that wooden windows would open easily (when not painted shut) and remain in the position required, because the glass and timber sash weight was equal to the lead weights, thus it is counter-balanced.

Little or no effort was required to move the sash because there is no friction between the sash and the frame, that’s why they often rattled and were draughty.

These are the Rolls Royce of spring balances. Designed by a Dutchman in 1946, they epitomise great engineering. Individually manufactured in 0.5kg increments (1lb), and for perfect lengths, these balances have two springs; one wound clockwise, the other anti-clockwise.

As a sash is opened, so one spring extends getting longer as the other compresses, getting shorter, counterbalancing each other for their entire life. They are immensely reliable.

 

Trickle Vents
Trickle vents

It is vital to have good ventilation. Without it people can suffer from breathing difficulties from poor air quality. Original box sashes provided 'natural background ventilation'… known as draughts.

The current building regulations for new buildings offer four system possibilities of achieving background ventilation. The most common adopted methods incorporate the use of trickle vents. Your architect will specify which method has been designed into your property.

When replacing existing windows the rules are slightly more relaxed. If trickle vents are present in the existing windows, they need to be incorporated into the new windows, however we would prefer not to fit them because they provide a super passage for airborn dirt, wind and noise to pass straight through our windows.

We would prefer you used sash windows properly, with both the top and bottom open. Sash windows are more efficient at purge ventilation and changing air than ANY other style of window.

For more information see health benefits.

 

Warning Label
Warning labels

There is nothing much to worry about with our windows – its just the sashes we make can be very heavy and we’d like to remind you before you try tilting them inwards for cleaning. They have been tested not to fail but its far better to be safe than sorry…

 

Colour suited window furniture
Window furniture suited colours

If you are considering cheaper alternatives where companies simply decide handles, cams, keeps and knobs by price alone, you’ll end up with three or four different colours of brass on the same window.

Because we use just one supplier for all our furniture they guarantee that all the window furniture on Bygone sash windows will match, every component will suite together so cam catches, knobs, limit stops, pole eyes and sash lifts (scroll handles) are available in antique brass, pewter, polished chrome, satin chrome, black and white.

 

If you like you can view a copy of the brochure and download it here, if you prefer we'll send you a hard copy in the post. If you're ready to know more, would you like to see a sample, discuss your options in detail or obtain a free assessment for the costs for your project, then please complete the enquiry form  with your contact details.

You can find an approved local premier partner here, who'll happily explain your choices and provide a no-obligation, fully detailed, written proposal.

If you prefer some answers now, please type your question into the chat box on the righthand side or simply call our free phone number, we'll happily help you resolve your sash window problems.

Accreditations >

Learn why you get better windows because of these

  • BBA - British Board of Agrément Certified
  • ISO 9001:2015 Certified Organisation
  • SBD - Secured By Design Approved Windows
  • British Fenestration Ratings Council - A Rating
  • Energy Savings Trust Recommended Windows
  • CE Compliant Windows
  • All Bygone windows are manufactured in the UK

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